What a woman wants? – KORAS

“When our family friend asked me about my insured value, i was astonished thinking about my identity to the world and purpose of my existence”, said Mrs Anjana Patodia while talking to us. A marwadi lady managing household, took a decision to create a platform for ladies like her who are talented, skilled, ambitious and looking for opportunity to showcase. An idea gave birth to KORAS – Surat’s first and only platform for Women.

WHAT: One must be thinking what is KORAS? is it a cafe? or a banquet hall?
Basically KORAS is a venue that hosts dreams of women wanting to prove themselves and are looking for opportunity. KORAS is multi utility centre for various purposes.
Its a
casual cafe,
a meeting place,
workshop area,
small banquet,
dance studio,
conference hall and much more
If you have kid[s] to take care, it has a kids play area too. So when you are busy with your work, KORAS will take care of them. And you will be amazed to see that all this has been managed by women. “There is no vertical hierarchy in KORAS, we believe that each woman is equal and beautiful”, said Ms Nandini Sultania [with a broad smile on her face]

cafe khawa

WHY: In Indian social structure, its difficult for a woman to make a name for herself as she is already occupied in tons of responsibility and by the time she feels she is free, age comes as a restriction and “लोग क्या कहेंगे?” comes as a hurdle in chasing a dream. KORAS facilitate the journey of proving your self to the world. Whatever talent you have, whatever skills you posses you can be a part of KORAS. They will provide physical space, networking, business and everything you need as a support.

WHO: As we mentioned above, everything here is managed by females. This place is by Women for Women with women. KORAS has:Home Chefs:  30+ home chefs who can provide their signature dishes to the customers through KORAS. Head Chef – Priyanka Sihotia and her team manages the cafe too.

Business Experts:Regular sessions help members to get benefits of the expert opinion. you can discuss your queries in open sessions and get proper information.

Entrepreneurs: If you are a woman entrepreneur and cant afford to have an office for your meetings, conferences or formal work, KORAS is the place for you. Become a member and get facilities for your needs.

Ladies: Its a venue that can host productive kitty parties. Females can come, do some creative things, enjoy delicacies and make a productive use of time.

Ultimately KORAS is a women Centric platform with a vision to be a support to the women of the society looking for the same.

 

KATRINA KAIF ASKS A HARD QUESTION: ‘DO I REALLY SUPPORT WOMEN AS MUCH AS I CAN?’

Katrina Kaif, who was recently appointed the ambassador for non-profit organisation Educate Girls, fired an array of uncomfortable questions when asked about women empowerment. When asked about the necessary steps she thinks should be considered to promote women empowerment, the 34-year-old actress told IANS: “I think a lot of steps have been taken all over the world. Whether it is equality at the workplace, whether it is the attitude we have towards each other, even for that matter the attitude that women have towards each other.” This is what she added as side-note: “Lately, I have become aware of it myself. Sometimes, I honestly feel that do we really support our contemporaries? Do I really support women as much as I can, the women who are around me and in my work area?”

WOMEN IN NEWS: MOVING FROM THE SIDEBAR TO THE FRONT PAGE

The World Association of News Publishers’ (WAN-IFRA) annual Congress in early June is one of the media world’s major industry events — a networking opportunity for close to a thousand attendees from international news publishing, with keynote speakers and panel discussions addressing the future of journalism and the news business in a time of convergent crises. It should be the pinnacle of good practice, shaping the path for industry progression.

But the 2018 World News Congress was a study in contrasts, one indicative of the news industry’s treatment of women: symbolic (and at times substantial) gestures of respect interspersed with real, sometimes shocking sexual discrimination and harassment.

THREE WOMEN’S STRUGGLE TO BE FIT AGAINST DOMESTIC DUTIES AND LACK OF SUPPORT

Health or fitness can be an elusive pursuit for so many of us. We struggle with waking up early, with eating right, with our own individual idiosyncrasies.

In Juhi Bhatt’s film Veil Done, however, we meet three women living in Delhi’s Nizamuddin East basti who have to fight to win their right to exercise. The film is a sobering account of how, for multitudes of India’s women, fitness is a liberated luxury, confined as they are to their homes, burdened with the never-ending cycle of domestic chores.

Afroz Jamala, Mehru Nisha, and Shah Jahan all live in the labyrinthine slum, spread over roughly a three-kilometre radius. Their parents prepared them for marriage, and after marriage, their husbands and in-laws have made all their decisions. Early in the film Jamala says, “Bol hi nahi sakte the kuch bhi, mard toh mard, aurato se bhi nahi bol sakte the… bolna aata hi nahi tha (I wasn’t allowed to speak, not just to men, I couldn’t even talk to you or any woman for that matter… I don’t think I even knew how to talk).”

TAVLEEN SINGH DUBBING METOO IN INDIA ‘IMITATIVE OF WEST’ EXPOSES HER DISCONNECT; REALITIES FOR WOMEN ARE SAME WORLDWIDE

In her column of 14 October, senior journalist Tavleen Singh murders 803 words to declare #MeToo movement in India as “irrelevant” and “a shabby copy” of its counterpart in America, to dismiss criticisms on Twitter of her defence of alleged sexual predators as a “torrent of abuse”, and to defend her “friend Suhel Seth” despite multiple accusations of sexual harassment.

 

She feels for a minister who could “lose his job” as junior foreign minister and feels nothing for more than a dozen women who faced harassment by him. The minister is MJ Akbar (he reportedly resigned on Sunday).

Continue reading

NOW, SAUDI WOMEN DON’T NEED MALE PERMISSION TO START OWN BUSINESS

    Women in Saudi Arabia can now open their own businesses without the consent of a husband or male relative, as the kingdom pushes to expand a fast-growing private sector.

The policy change, announced by the Saudi government on Thursday, also marks a major step away from the strict guardianship system that has ruled the country for decades.

“Women can now launch their own businesses and benefit from governmental e-services without having to prove consent from a guardian,” the ministry of commerce and investment said on its website.

Under Saudi Arabia’s guardianship system, women are required to present proof of permission from a male “guardian” normally the husband, father or brother to do any government paperwork, travel or enrol in classes.

Long dependent on crude production for economic revenue, Saudi Arabia is pushing to expand the country’s private sector, including an expansion of female employment under a reform plan for a post-oil era.

While women still face a host of restrictions in the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom, Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor’s office this month said it would begin recruiting women investigators for the first time.